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Deformations (Positional Plagiocephaly)

 
An infantís skull is made up of free-floating bones that are separated by sutures. The sutures, which act as expansion joints, allow the skull to mold for birthing and to expand with the rapidly growing brain.

While many infants are born with an abnormal head shape, due to the trip through the narrow birth canal, most will correct themselves within six weeks following the birth. When an abnormal head shape persists or is not noticed until after six weeks, it is important to determine the cause. A correct diagnosis is essential and should be made by a qualified specialist.

The diagnosis most often given is of a Positional Head Deformity. Due to the malleable nature of an infantís skull, it is possible for external pressures to cause skull deformity. The most common Positional Head Deformity is Positional Plagiocephaly.

Positional Plagiocephaly is caused when repeated external pressure is applied to one side of the occiput (the back of the head) and a flat spot occurs. The side of the occiput that is flattened will often be accompanied by a prominent forehead, which when viewed from above will give the head a parallelogram shape instead of a normal symmetric oval shape.

It is also common for an infant with Positional Plagiocephaly to have misaligned ears (the ear on the effected side may be pulled forward and down and be larger then the unaffected ear) and facial asymmetry, with the affected side of the face having a fuller cheek, and a more prominent appearance. Facial asymmetry on the affected side can also include a jawbone that is tilted, and an eye that appears displaced and mismatched in size.
 
 
Surgery stories
    

Cameron Rondi
Cameron Mark Rondi was born on the 10th of March at Olivedale Hospital. When he was born he was diagnosed with Craniosynosis, it was picked up at birth as he was born with facial distortion ...

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Blake Campbell
Blakes surgery day was 4 April 2006...

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Azia-lynn
(not so) little Azia-lynn is born 1 week early (on her original due date!) 8lb 15oz and 21 inches...

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Tiaan Heyns
Tiaan was diagnosed with Sagittal Synostosis at six weeks of age.

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Chris-Lee - Our Miracle Child
In January 2007 after several tests and treatment Ė I was told that I will not be able to have children. 

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Claire Badden

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For more information or support, please contact Robyn Rondi on - robyn.rondi@hotmail.com  or  082 601 8585