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Educating Others on Cranio

 

When it comes to Craniosynostosis you need to take the time to look for the beauty within.

The best part of become a Cranio family is Education of others

The below needs to be credited to the Author Kristi Branstetter:-

How to deal with individuals who have Craniofacial or Other Facial Differences:-

1 . Do not talk down to someone with a facial difference.
Most have normal intelligence. People with facial differences don't need or want to be talked to as if they don't understand.

2. Don't stare and point.
People with facial differences are human. Besides it is not polite to point and stare. It makes people with facial differences feel uncomfortable.

3. Do ask!
People with facial differences often hear parents tell their children that it is not polite to ask questions. As an adult with a facial difference, I want kids to ask questions. I don't mind answering because I enjoy educating others about my facial difference. Parents without children with differences, I encourage you to let you children ask questions.. That is how children learn!

4. Don't avoid eye contact.
People with facial differences are very much aware of this. It makes the person with a facial difference feel negatively about themselves. Often people with facial differences have self-esteem issues.

5. Don't tease or bully.
This is true for anyone not just people with facial differences. Teasing and bullying is hurtful and can have tragic consequences. We all have differences whether we realize it or not.

6. Don't exaggerate someone's facial difference
This means do not use inappropriate language such as ravaged face or smashed-in face. It is demeaning, plain and simple. Simply say.. a person with a facial difference, a person with a congenital facial difference, or a person with an acquired facial difference.

7. Use people first language
Emphasize the person first not the difference. Don't use phrases such as cleft-affected or cleftie. I don't want to be known as an arhinia person. I want to be known as a person with congenital arhinia.

8. Don't use out-of-date language.
There are some words that just need not be repeated. Harelip is one of them. Don't use the word because it has a negative connotation to anyone with a cleft lip. (It literally means the lip of a hare.) People with cleft lips are not rabbits.

9. Don't pity people with facial differences.
People with facial differences do not want sympathy or pity. People with facial differences want three things: Understanding, respect, and acceptance. People with facial differences are people too!

10. Teach Your Children Acceptance and understanding
Parents, stop sheltering your children... Teach them to understand and accept ALL difference. Our world can become a better world but it begins with adults teaching our children. Set an example and be the difference.

Look beyond the imperfections of flesh and bone to see who hides behind. Join me in celebration of true beauty of heart and soul. Learn to accept beauty in the uniqueness of each individual. Smile and accept instead of shunning and teasing.

We are all different no one is perfect.

Each of us have flaws although some more than others.

However, if you look beyond you might see the true beauty that may have been missed.

 
 
Surgery stories
    

Cameron Rondi
Cameron Mark Rondi was born on the 10th of March at Olivedale Hospital. When he was born he was diagnosed with Craniosynosis, it was picked up at birth as he was born with facial distortion ...

read more >>

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Blake Campbell
Blakes surgery day was 4 April 2006...

read more >>

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Azia-lynn
(not so) little Azia-lynn is born 1 week early (on her original due date!) 8lb 15oz and 21 inches...

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Tiaan Heyns
Tiaan was diagnosed with Sagittal Synostosis at six weeks of age.

read more >>

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Chris-Lee - Our Miracle Child
In January 2007 after several tests and treatment I was told that I will not be able to have children. 

read more >>

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Claire Badden

read more >>

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For more information or support, please contact Robyn Rondi on - robyn.rondi@hotmail.com  or  082 601 8585